English Language Studies for Pastoral Ministry

English Language Studies for Pastoral Ministry


The English Language Studies for Pastoral Ministry (ELSPM) aims to train pastoral workers and theological students who speak a language other than English as their first language. Its objective is to develop skills in English in a Christian and theological environment and to improve communication to a level which will enable them to participate effectively in a pastoral ministry of the contemporary Church.

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Spiritual care week with SCA Tasmania

Spiritual Care Week 2021 - Advancing Spiritual Care Through ResearchSpiritual Care Week runs 25 October through 30 October 2021. The theme is ‘Advancing Spiritual Care Through Research’. Spiritual Care Australia – Tasmania Branch – will host a presentation with Prof Megan Best speaking on research in spiritual care at the Keith Milingen Lecture theatre, Royal Hobart Hospital on 25 October 2021 commencing 2:00pm.

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Spiritual Care Week 2021 – Advancing Spiritual Care Through Research

Spiritual Care Week 2021 - Advancing Spiritual Care Through ResearchThe week of October 24-30, 2021 represents 36 years of celebrating Spiritual Care Week. Spiritual care has a wonderful history of cultures and religions which engage with a continuum of healthcare providers in supporting patients and families. This year’s theme emphasizes collaboration with a focus on chaplains providing spiritual care in ways that affirm and value their contribution as well as foster an appreciation for what is considered important for holistic care.

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WHO and Religions for Peace global conference

WHO and Religions for Peace global conference

The World Health Organisation along with Religions for Peace and EPI-WIN Faith Communities of Practice will conduct a global conference on strengthening national responses to health emergencies. The sessions of the conference will feature innovative responses in the areas of (i) Spiritual care during times of crisis, (ii) Country collaboration between WHO, faith partners and national governments, (iii) Trust and health histories, and (iv) Communication and advocacy for vaccine equity, access, and uptake.

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Chaplains can be a key treatment resource in secular workplaces

Chaplains in secular workplacesParticularly for complex, crisis-driven and emergency service workplaces, emerging research and certainly trauma and stress focussed praxis indicates the usefulness of pastoral care and chaplains, in particular, as part of inter-disciplinary treatment responses. However, the reality in some organisations is notably different. Sometimes, chaplains are seen as anachronistic or “just” for the religiously minded. This reflection article briefly reviews the substantial and emerging applied research that places chaplaincy care at the centre of treatment and care – yet always in support of medical and psychological care. Not only does it challenge certain limiting notions, it suggests that many ill or injured workers in the search for meaning, healing, and the restoration of relationships and trust actively use chaplains. Leader and researchers are encouraged to take note of this and engage with holistic forms of care.

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Chaplaincy and Competency: Scope of Practice

care

This document seeks to articulate the scope of practice that chaplains need to effectively and reliably produce quality spiritual care. It follows on the work of an international, multidisciplinary consensus panel that identified a list of evidence-based quality indicators for spiritual care and suggested metrics and measures for each.

Having identified the quality indicators for spiritual care to create the reference point for all that is to follow, this next step seeks to establish what chaplains need to be doing to meet those indicators and provide evidence-based quality care.

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Inclusivity in UK Pastoral, Spiritual, and Religious Care: A Humanist Perspective

Inclusivity in UK Pastoral, Spiritual, and Religious Care: A Humanist Perspective

Chaplaincy – wherever it serves – will inevitably encounter those of no particular religious belief. A chaplain serves and meets needs where duty calls. How does a chaplain meet the needs of a non-religous person? Here, we bring a series of articles which directly address this growing phenomenon that is encountered in all domains of chaplaincy service.

Dr. David Savage is the author of Non-Religious Pastoral Care: A Practical Guide, and he took a leading role in establishing the Non-Religious Pastoral Support Network. He has provided pastoral care at Guy’s and St. Thomas NHS Foundation Trust since 2012, and was the first non-religious person to successfully complete their spiritual healthcare department’s two-year professional training course.

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Non-religious spirituality

park benchIn this article, we read of a spiritual care encounter with a person holding a worldview derived from an empirical approach to the natural world, in order to reflect on the nature of non-religious spirituality and its implications for the spiritual care sector. Non-religious spirituality is examined as a genuine form of spirituality. What follows are excerpts from a paper by Dr. Christopher Turner of Stirling University.

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Non-religious spiritual care

Forest in IsraelIn this article we consider spiritual care uncoupled from formal clergy in Israel. We look to the utilisation of spiritual care by spiritual care providers in various settings, respectively: a private clinic, a nursing home, and the haematology department. Each used one of three religiously neutral methods of spiritual care: connecting with nature, nature and gentle touch, and non-theistic personal prayer in its various forms.

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There is always hope: A conversation with Chaplain Imam Abdul-Wahab Omeira

Yule observance in PrisonWhat is Chaplaincy? When an untrained Muslim cleric – student of a Grand Mufti in Syria – builds a Mosque and then a Prison is built near the mosque, he responds to the call of serving, of being a volunteer. From part time to full-time chaplain, Imam Abdul-Wahab Omeira serves people from all faiths, including Wiccans and Pagans. He says that having religion in prison – and religious services – is a right, not a privilege. An interesting, wide-ranging article that rings bells for those who have worked as a chaplain.

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